Helpful information

From our experience, we know that people vary greatly in there mechanical abilities. As such, this section presents all the essential services that every customer, whether you own a small home or a commercial building, should perform annually. So, be sure to read this section and follow the steps closely. 

In addition, we try to incorporate the more advanced technical aspects of our industry so that, should you have the desire, you can try working on your heating or air conditioning units yourself. However, we want to emphasize maximum safety if you are going to attempt to work on your own equipment. We encourage you to call us if you have a question.

We present more information than you could ever want or need to become an expert, if you so choose. 

There are 4 main components (5 if we include refrigerant) used in the refrigeration cycle:

  • Fluids absorb heat while changing from a liquid state to a vapor state. Fluids give up heat in changing from a vapor to a liquid.
  • The temperature at which a change of state occurs is constant during the change, provided the pressure remains constant.
  • Heat flows only from a body which is at a higher temperature to a body which is at a lower temperature (hot to cold).
  • Metallic parts of the evaporating and condensing units use metals that have a high heat conductivity (copper, brass, aluminum).
  • Heat energy and other forms of energy are interchangeable. For example, electricity may be converted to heat; heat to electricity energy; and heat to mechanical energy.

It is important to fully understand these concepts and components if you are going to be working on any refrigeration system. The main process of refrigeration relies mostly on heat transfers, but just how those transfers are accomplished is where it becomes intricate and, sometimes, downright confusing. We’ll start with the compressor, which is the heart of any refrigeration cycle. The compressor serves two purposes, the first is to circulate the refrigerant and the second, of course, is to compress the refrigerant. This is important because the refrigerant leaves the compressor as a high-pressure, high-temperature, superheated vapor. The vapor is then discharged to the condenser where another series of important processes occur. Perhaps the most obvious process is condensing. The high-pressure, high-temperature, superheated vapor is pushed through a large coil that’s been optimized with aluminum fins for cooling. This is where one heat transfer occurs. Most importantly, the heat from your house is being dumped into the outside air or being converted to hot water for domestic use, whichever your house is setup for. Air or water cools the refrigeration to a lower temperature liquid and the refrigerant exits the condenser and enters a filter dryer. In the filter dryer, moisture and any particulates are removed by means of desiccants. From here, the refrigerant is sent to the next component, which is the metering device. Different systems use different methods for metering the flow of refrigerant, but on residential units you will most likely find thermal expansion valves. The idea of a thermal expansion valve is to control the refrigerant flow into the evaporator while simultaneously controlling the superheat on the outlet of the evaporator. The metering is usually controlled by a temperature sensing bulb that opens or closes a power head on the thermal expansion valve depending on the temperature of the refrigerant. If the bulb senses a lower temperature the head will close and, subsequently, less refrigerant will flow into the evaporator. When the bulb senses higher temperatures, the head will open and allow more refrigerant to flow into the evaporator. On newer systems, we are seeing more and more electronically controlled thermal expansion, but the theory remains the same. Thermal expansion valves are generally used on higher efficient systems. The next and last component, of course, is the evaporator. When the high-pressure liquid refrigerant leaves the metering device, it becomes a low-pressure, low-temperature saturated vapor. The refrigerant enters the evaporator where the next heat transfer takes place. The hot air from your home is forced over the outside of the cooler coil where the refrigerant is ‘boiling off’ inside. This allows for a higher absorption rate of heat to occur and the refrigerant will quickly become a dry vapor. After the evaporator, the refrigerant will not be able to do anything else until it is forced through the compressor once again and the cycle starts over.

There are 4 main components (5 if we include refrigerant) used in the refrigeration cycle:

  • Fluids absorb heat while changing from a liquid state to a vapor state. Fluids give up heat in changing from a vapor to a liquid.
  • The temperature at which a change of state occurs is constant during the change, provided the pressure remains constant.
  • Heat flows only from a body which is at a higher temperature to a body which is at a lower temperature (hot to cold).
  • Metallic parts of the evaporating and condensing units use metals that have a high heat conductivity (copper, brass, aluminum).
  • Heat energy and other forms of energy are interchangeable. For example, electricity may be converted to heat; heat to electricity energy; and heat to mechanical energy.

It is important to fully understand these concepts and components if you are going to be working on any refrigeration system. The main process of refrigeration relies mostly on heat transfers, but just how those transfers are accomplished is where it becomes intricate and, sometimes, downright confusing. We’ll start with the compressor, which is the heart of any refrigeration cycle. The compressor serves two purposes, the first is to circulate the refrigerant and the second, of course, is to compress the refrigerant. This is important because the refrigerant leaves the compressor as a high-pressure, high-temperature, superheated vapor. The vapor is then discharged to the condenser where another series of important processes occur. Perhaps the most obvious process is condensing. The high-pressure, high-temperature, superheated vapor is pushed through a large coil that’s been optimized with aluminum fins for cooling. This is where one heat transfer occurs. Most importantly, the heat from your house is being dumped into the outside air or being converted to hot water for domestic use, whichever your house is setup for. Air or water cools the refrigeration to a lower temperature liquid and the refrigerant exits the condenser and enters a filter dryer. In the filter dryer, moisture and any particulates are removed by means of desiccants. From here, the refrigerant is sent to the next component, which is the metering device. Different systems use different methods for metering the flow of refrigerant, but on residential units you will most likely find thermal expansion valves. The idea of a thermal expansion valve is to control the refrigerant flow into the evaporator while simultaneously controlling the superheat on the outlet of the evaporator. The metering is usually controlled by a temperature sensing bulb that opens or closes a power head on the thermal expansion valve depending on the temperature of the refrigerant. If the bulb senses a lower temperature the head will close and, subsequently, less refrigerant will flow into the evaporator. When the bulb senses higher temperatures, the head will open and allow more refrigerant to flow into the evaporator. On newer systems, we are seeing more and more electronically controlled thermal expansion, but the theory remains the same. Thermal expansion valves are generally used on higher efficient systems. The next and last component, of course, is the evaporator. When the high-pressure liquid refrigerant leaves the metering device, it becomes a low-pressure, low-temperature saturated vapor. The refrigerant enters the evaporator where the next heat transfer takes place. The hot air from your home is forced over the outside of the cooler coil where the refrigerant is ‘boiling off’ inside. This allows for a higher absorption rate of heat to occur and the refrigerant will quickly become a dry vapor. After the evaporator, the refrigerant will not be able to do anything else until it is forced through the compressor once again and the cycle starts over.

There are 4 main components (5 if we include refrigerant) used in the refrigeration cycle:

  • Fluids absorb heat while changing from a liquid state to a vapor state. Fluids give up heat in changing from a vapor to a liquid.
  • The temperature at which a change of state occurs is constant during the change, provided the pressure remains constant.
  • Heat flows only from a body which is at a higher temperature to a body which is at a lower temperature (hot to cold).
  • Metallic parts of the evaporating and condensing units use metals that have a high heat conductivity (copper, brass, aluminum).
  • Heat energy and other forms of energy are interchangeable. For example, electricity may be converted to heat; heat to electricity energy; and heat to mechanical energy.

It is important to fully understand these concepts and components if you are going to be working on any refrigeration system. The main process of refrigeration relies mostly on heat transfers, but just how those transfers are accomplished is where it becomes intricate and, sometimes, downright confusing. We’ll start with the compressor, which is the heart of any refrigeration cycle. The compressor serves two purposes, the first is to circulate the refrigerant and the second, of course, is to compress the refrigerant. This is important because the refrigerant leaves the compressor as a high-pressure, high-temperature, superheated vapor. The vapor is then discharged to the condenser where another series of important processes occur. Perhaps the most obvious process is condensing. The high-pressure, high-temperature, superheated vapor is pushed through a large coil that’s been optimized with aluminum fins for cooling. This is where one heat transfer occurs. Most importantly, the heat from your house is being dumped into the outside air or being converted to hot water for domestic use, whichever your house is setup for. Air or water cools the refrigeration to a lower temperature liquid and the refrigerant exits the condenser and enters a filter dryer. In the filter dryer, moisture and any particulates are removed by means of desiccants. From here, the refrigerant is sent to the next component, which is the metering device. Different systems use different methods for metering the flow of refrigerant, but on residential units you will most likely find thermal expansion valves. The idea of a thermal expansion valve is to control the refrigerant flow into the evaporator while simultaneously controlling the superheat on the outlet of the evaporator. The metering is usually controlled by a temperature sensing bulb that opens or closes a power head on the thermal expansion valve depending on the temperature of the refrigerant. If the bulb senses a lower temperature the head will close and, subsequently, less refrigerant will flow into the evaporator. When the bulb senses higher temperatures, the head will open and allow more refrigerant to flow into the evaporator. On newer systems, we are seeing more and more electronically controlled thermal expansion, but the theory remains the same. Thermal expansion valves are generally used on higher efficient systems. The next and last component, of course, is the evaporator. When the high-pressure liquid refrigerant leaves the metering device, it becomes a low-pressure, low-temperature saturated vapor. The refrigerant enters the evaporator where the next heat transfer takes place. The hot air from your home is forced over the outside of the cooler coil where the refrigerant is ‘boiling off’ inside. This allows for a higher absorption rate of heat to occur and the refrigerant will quickly become a dry vapor. After the evaporator, the refrigerant will not be able to do anything else until it is forced through the compressor once again and the cycle starts over.

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